History of Skin Care
Is As Timeless As Beauty

History of Skin Care - have you ever wondered about the history of skin care? In a world where women spend so much time and money trying to find new ways to cover up the imperfections on their faces, it is important to remember the role skin care should play in the daily regimen.

While it may seem that skin care is a recent luxury, you may be surprised to learn that skin care actually dates back thousands of years. The uses of many of these historical cosmetic skin care products varied greatly depending on the type, however, they all had one thing in common: they helped to enhance the physical beauty of users.

  

Egyptian

Where It All Began

  • In 1400 BC, the Egyptians were skilled with using herbs and oils for skin care purposes. Not only did they use pumice stones and special hennas, but they also used scented creams.  One look into the Egyptian history of skin care, and it is clear to see that body oils were important to the Egyptians. In fact, in early Egypt, body oils were paid to workers on a daily basis. And these special oils were not only reserved for the extremely rich, even those who had the lowest jobs were given their fair share of body oils.
  • The oils helped to protect their skin from the harsh sun filled atmosphere. Although timber was the most primary reason for  foreign, commercial trade in Egypt, most of their skin care also had to be imported as well. Women weren't the only Egyptians who were focused on caring for their skin; men also benefited from extensive skin care treatments.



History of Skin Care Also Dates
Back to Greece

  • The early athletes in Greece prepared for competitions by applying oils and sand to help protect their skin from the sun damage. The oil provided a base that allowed the sand to stick to their skin, and the sand lowered their body temperature, making them more effective athletes. The barrier of the oil also helped to keep their pores from becoming clogged with dirt and other debris. In fact, different oils for skin care purposes were sometimes given as prizes in competitions.
  • One look into the Egyptian history of skin care, and it is clear to see that body oils were important to the Egyptians. In fact, in early Egypt, body oils were paid to workers on a daily basis. And these special oils were not only reserved for the extremely rich, even those who had the lowest jobs were given their fair share of body oils. The oils helped to protect their skin from the harsh sun filled atmosphere. Although timber was the most primary reason for foreign, commercial trade in Egypt, most of their skin care also had to be imported as well. Women weren't the only Egyptians who were focused on caring for their skin; men also benefited from extensive skin care treatments.

  • Did you know that stretch mark treatments even have a place in the history of skin care? Ancient Roman women used olive oil to help prevent and remove stretch marks during and after their pregnancies. And while there are many popular treatments in modern times that address hair loss, the Romans treated their scalps with a mixture of juniper berries and myrtle to promote thicker hair.
  • Greeks, Romans, Egyptians and Acne

    • Even acne was a common problem in the history of skin care. It has been recorded that many different pharaohs dealt with acne. In Rome, acne sufferers sought relief by bathing in hot mineral and sulfur infused baths. And the Greeks and Romans were believers in the acne fighting powers of olive lead extract. The Egyptians, however, discovered that strawberry leaves were just the thing to help fight acne. They would place slightly moistened strawberry leaves on the face to treat breakouts.
    • Although the Greeks, Romans and Egyptians were incredibly focused on cleanliness and outward beauty, as time progressed, residents of European countries did not pay much attention to these details. This lack of cleanliness led to much illness and death. Early Europeans did however have their own extreme and sometimes even dangerous beauty fads that became popular, including: lead infused foundations, powders and facial peels. In fact, Queen Elizabeth I became a victim of severe facial disfigurement due to the repeated uses of these lead based products.

    History of Skin Care in The Early 1900’s

    • Starting in the early 1900's, many cosmetic companies were developed and began making skin care and cosmetics for women everywhere. Some of these companies that were developed were: L'Oreal, Elizabeth Arden, Max Factor, and Maybelline. Florence Nightingale, the developer of Elizabeth Arden, joined forces with a chemist and together they formulated the signature Elizabeth Arden face cream that was labeled "science-based skincare."

    When new skin care products started being developed, some cosmetic companies worried that they would lose money, but the opposite was true. While some worried that the development of advanced forms of skin care would cause them to lose money, they soon discovered this was not the case.

    Once consumers were able to treat their skin care flaws, they actually felt more comfortable and confident in makeup because they felt that their beauty was showcased even more. In fact, today, some makeup is infused with anti aging and acne fighting medicines that allows wearers to treat their skin while wearing makeup. 


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